Increasingly, we live in a world in which being connected is prioritized over personal privacy. From social media websites, connected cars and public security camera systems; across the U.S. and throughout the world, today personal privacy is something that most people only truly enjoy in the comfort of their own homes.

Issues related to privacy in the workplace are often especially complex as businesses fight to defend against unfair business practices and to maintain a competitive edge. Many businesses also struggle with how to manage and handle employment issues as new technologies emerge that make it easier to track everything from the websites an employee visits to the actual hours he or she spends working.

As employers continue to invest in software and technologies they argue are aimed to save money and increase productivity, employees argue that such technologies go too far and infringe on their rights to privacy. One recent California lawsuit highlights how some employers may be going too far when it comes to monitoring employees.

The lawsuit was filed by a former sales executive who argues that her employer went too far in requesting that employees download an application that included GPS monitoring on their cellphones. While the employee stated she had no issues with being monitored during work hours, the application allowed her employer to monitor her whereabouts all of the time.

When the employee’s concerns about privacy fell on deaf ears, she decided to uninstall the application. She was scolded for doing so and subsequently fired. In the lawsuit, the woman argues that her former employer violated numerous state and federal labor laws, violated her right to privacy and wrongfully terminated her employment.

Los Angeles area employees who have similar concerns with regard to workplace privacy can benefit from the advice and assistance of an attorney.

Source: NJ.com, “Lawsuit Questions Legality of Tracking Employees 24/7,” Donald Scarinci, Aug. 4, 2015